Category: Education Page 1 of 3

Helping Your Child to Focus on Learning without Stress

Really, who does not have learning issues as a child? Children want to play and play and play. It is obviously going to be somewhat difficult getting them to the study table. Even more, if they reluctantly come to study, it can get tougher getting them to focus on the lessons. This seems to be a very common issue with parents. Reactions to such lack of attention may range from criticizing the child or being not so happy, so to say.

Do not worry

Actually, you just need to be patient. It may sound like a typical suggestion, something that you always seem to know! Well, please consider the fact that the problem is not very far from being typical as well. Parents and guardians always have to face this issue of getting the child’s undivided attention. Often, a concerned mother may become impatient because she tends to think that there may be some sort of an attention span disorder in the child. So, simply do not let your mind get to conclusions such as ADHD or Autism! Parents are also anxious about their children missing out on the competitive edge early on. Take your time. Have hope.

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Photo by Sai De Silva on Unsplash

Responsibility of parents

Focus on growing your bonding with the child. It is necessary to accept the responsibility of not being able to connect with the child in a way that your young one listens to what you are saying! Start with spending quality time with your children. Play with them. Set your professional tasks aside as much as you can to be close to your family.

In the event that parents may have personal differences, it is good to sort it out peacefully. Always remember that it should be wrong to blame the child for any issues between parents. One does not choose to be born anyway! Besides, having an uncomfortable atmosphere is the home is more stressful for a young one, directly affecting their attention span.

Happy times

About creating a really beautiful atmosphere, you can try playing good music. You will find it surprising how well does the music therapy work! Even as grownups, people usually find it easier to concentrate, with their favorite music playing in headphones. It kind of creates a detached personal space to give the best. Obviously, you need to follow your wisdom in selecting the right tune. Anything that’s too loud, or haphazard, is not cool. Choose soothing instrumental tracks, jazz, or good country music (just a suggestion)! When the young scholar is studying, you can even consider creating a very silent ambiance. Shut down the TV. Keep the conversations into a low tone.

Parents, in their natural state of worry, often forget the simplest thing to ask the children about their problems. They tend to assume that they already know what it is. This may be a way of self-denial as well. So, take a good look at your own approach and recover that heart to heart connection with your child. Make sure that your young one is not afraid to give the true reply. You can always seek professional help online. Find experienced educators who can help you with practiced suggestions for helping your child. Even while putting these ideas to practice, you got to be tolerant.

Another usual mistake many people make is to approach issues with a very technical mindset. As if, there is a switch to turn on to make a robot work to commands! Instead, approach with affection, empathy, and understanding. There may be matters such as how the mind processes information and why motor skills are motor skills, but they should not make you numb to the human element of everything.  If you think this is the problem, then take a temporary turnaround from the digital world and connect to nature. Go on family trips and enjoy outdoor vacations wholeheartedly.

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Photo by Jon Flobrant on Unsplash

Open-mindedness

Obviously, the digital world can be very helpful as well! Look up good online resources where people facing similar problems share their experiences. You can also connect by reaching out. Discuss your issues and be open to receiving help. It may not be helpful to assume that you already know all the answers! Well, you may have clues, but it does no harm in gleaning the best on how to go ahead with the clues to effective solutions.

Most importantly, follow the clues that are apparent with your child’s behavior. Look carefully at the moments when he is occasionally paying attention. Try to understand what is causing this change of mood and encourage it. See that the little one is getting enough time to play and rest as well. Keep working on growing your bond with your baby. Read together. Reading before sleep is an excellent idea! Apart from helping you to comfort the young soul, it also helps the young ones to develop reading habits. Finally, do not be in tension about professional competition from such an early stage. Everything is going to work well, have that faith! It always does! Of course, before that, you need to go through the usual challenges in the right way.   

Educational, Father’s Day card craft

This Father’s Day, help your child to make a cute Father’s Day card with a message of appreciation.

This is a great activity because it provides you with the opportunity to discuss letter names and sounds while creating something for dad.

1. Explain that you are going to make a card for dad, that has a message on the front. Discuss possible messages such as; You are the best, I love my dad, etc.…

2. Once you have decided on the message, write it in large letters on a piece of paper and place it in front of your child. Discuss the different letters and sounds that are in the message. Depending on the age and stage of your child you could also practise sounding out the words.

3. Fold a piece of card in half to make the Father’s Day card and put it, along with a collection of foam or plastic letters in front of your child. Allow your child to use the message you wrote to help them to find each letter that they need to create their message. As they find each letter, help them to lay it on the card to create the words.

4. Once all of the letters have been found and placed correctly on the card, glue them in place and leave the card to dry.

5. Once dry, help your child to finish the card by writing a message on the inside.

Have a great Father’s Day, everyone, and please share your creations with us.

Top ten children’s books for book week

Book Week is one of my favourite times to be a teacher. Not only do I have the opportunity to focus on my passion, children’s literacy and reading children’s books for a whole week; I am also luck enough to work in an amazing school that goes all out in celebrating and promoting reading through book week festivities.

Visit our school during our Book Week celebrations and you will be transported into a world where the students and teachers are dressed up as their favourite book characters whilst enjoying guess the book competitions, guest readers, daily drop everything and read sessions and Mad Hatters tea parties where the older children read to the younger ones. This all leads up to a school play extravaganza, staring teachers, rather than students, acting out a well-loved story with a twist. This year’s will be the Jolly Postman with a few extra characters, including Roald Dahl’s Twits, Harry Potter, Hermione and of course, my role, the postman’s cat.

If your child has not yet started school, and you would like to create some Book Week learning fun of your own, here are my top ten children’s books to read at home. Each of these books is perfect for cultivating a love of reading and have many opportunities for fun, activities that will improve reading comprehension skills.  

(These books are personal favourites that I have used for teaching. I have not been paid to promote these titles.)

My top ten children’s books to read at home

#1

Possum Magic, by Mem Fox

#2 

Magic Beach, by Alison Lester

#3

Diary of a wombat, by Jackie French

#4

The pros and cons of being a frog, by Sue DeGennaro

#5

The enormous crocodile, by Roald Dahl

#6

The Gruffalo, by Julia Donaldson

#7

The very hungry caterpillar, by Eric Carle

#8

The Jolly Postman, by Allan and Janet Ahlberg

#9

Bamboozled, by David Legge

I just have to add one fantastic picture book for older children aged 10 years +.

#10

The water tower, by Gary Crew

If you have a reluctant reader, this is a great book to piqué their interest. The mysterious story and expressive illustrations really capture children’s attention and leads them to anticipate reading the Gary Crew sequel, Beneath the surface. Here is a trailer for the first book, The water tower, guaranteed to intrigue your reluctant reader.

Tell us your favourite children’s books

Please add to this list of fantastic children’s books by telling us your children’s favourites in the comment box below, or help us promote children’s literacy by joining us for the Love2Read, Reading Hour on the 24th August.

Have a great Book Week, everyone and be sure to add your favourite books, below!

Love2Read for 10 minutes a day

Why you should Love2Read with your child

Children begin to learn about language and reading from the day they are born. Research shows that the more exposure children have to books before starting school, the easier they learn to read. There are a number of reasons for this.

  • Children learn how to use books from seeing others read

  • While listening to stories children are exposed to new vocabulary and concepts

  • Exposure to letters and words helps children to recognise letters and their names and sounds

  • Children begin to develop a bank of sight words that they can recognise without sounding out the letters
  • Children improve read comprehension skills by being exposed to a range of text types
  • Children develop more language skills from birth, to the age of three years, than they do at any other time so it is important to start early

The Reading Hour

Parents live busy lives, but if you can find 10 minutes, most days, to read to your children, it soon adds up to a whole hour. Just an hour a week of reading is an excellent way to introduce literacy to children and begin encouraging children to Love2Read.

The Reading Hour is the perfect time to start reading regularly to your child and help spread the word about the importance of reading to children.

Join in

This year’s reading hour is from 5pm till 6pm on Saturday the 24th August. We encourage you to make a commitment to reading to your child for 10 minutes a day and join us in reading to your child during The Reading Hour. Help us to promote The Reading Hour and encourage other parents to join us by posting the title of the book you will be reading to your child during The Reading Hour, or a photo of you reading to your child, on Facebook. 

If need some inspiration finding great picture books to read to your child, check out our top ten children’s books for book week.

Dont forget to use our Facebook comment box below to help us spread the word that ten minutes a day is all it takes to give your child a positive introduction to reading!

I look forwards to hearing which books you will be reading.

NAIDOC Week Activity

NAIDOC week is a time to celebrate traditional, indigenous culture in Australia and recognise the contributions of indigenous Australians.

This NAIDOC week we have a fun, letter shape recognition activity, inspired by traditional dot painting.

This is such an easy, yet fun activity and the repetitive nature of creating the dots helps children to  consolidate their recognition of letter shapes.

Write a letter that you are working on, onto a piece of paper. Ask your child what the letter’s name and sound is and practise saying it together.

Show your child how to create dots using paint and a cotton bud. Ask your child to go over the letter outline that you have created using bright, paint dots. You could also explain to your child that dot painting is a traditional form of painting originally done by Aboriginal people.

Use other colours to make dots around the letter shape that your child has traced over with dots.

Your child’s finished dot paintings can be displayed and used as letter recognition cards. We would love to see some of your creations on Facebook.

Auditory Processing Disorder

Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) or Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD) is a disorder that affects the way sounds are processed and interpreted by the brain. A child with an Auditory Processing Disorder may have perfect hearing, but will become confused when trying to process information that is heard. This results in the child not understanding the message being given, or in the incorrect interpretation of the sounds heard. There are a number of types of Auditory Processing Disorders and each affect the processing and interpretation of sounds differently.

What causes Ausitory Processing Disorder?

Auditory Processing Disorder is believed to be a neurological disorder of the central auditory nervous system. Brain functions associated with sound processing, and short-term memory, do not work effectively in children with APD. This can be due to a neurological developmental issue or a head trauma. Auditory Processing Disorders are not believed to have a bearing on IQ.

How does Auditory Processing Disorder affect learning?

The most common learning issues include;

  • Difficulty distinguishing between letter sounds
  • Reading difficulties
  • Poor spelling
  • Poor recognition of sight words
  • Difficulty comprehending meaning
  • Difficulty distinguishing between statements, questions and jokes
  • Difficulty understanding or remembering and following instructions
  • Difficulty paying attention to a speaker

How is Auditory Processing Disorder diagnosed?

You or your child’s teacher or childcare provider will probably be the first to identify the possibility of Auditory Processing Disorder. Initially, you may mistake auditory processing difficulties as a hearing or behaviour problem. If you have concerns talk to your child’s teacher or childcare provider about their observations and then visit your doctor to discuss your observations.

How is Auditory Processing Disorder treated?

There are a number of methods used to treat Auditory Processing Disorders. Although the disorder cannot be cured, teachers and other professionals, focus on developing sound recognition and short-term memory skills that will help the child to use and understand language more effectively. Learning activities specific to each individual child’s needs are used to develop these skills.

What now?

  • Download our Auditory Processing Disorder mini e-book to read about APD in more detail
  • Download our Auditory Processing Disorder Checklist
  • Make an appointment with your childs teacher or doctor to discuss your concerns
  • Read our tips on communicating effectivly with children who have APD
  • Use our Letter Names and Sounds program to practise sound recognition

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